Curriculum & Guidance

Lisa Kahan, Middle School Guidance Counselor

lkahan@haldaneschool.org

Haldane Honor Roll Criteria

Principal's List: 95-100

High Honor Roll: 90-94

Honor Roll: 85-89

6th Grade Curriculum

Language Arts

Writing

Student writing should go through a process of planning, drafting, revising and editing before it is considered a finished product.

Sixth Grade writing includes:

  • Informational writing, such as articles or reports using three or more sources of information. This writing should use details and examples to support larger ideas.
  • Literature responses, such as an essay making connections between characters or themes from different stories. This writing should express the student’s thinking and should use examples from the stories to support his or her ideas.
  • Personal Narratives containing writing that should use a variety of strategies to create interest, such as dialogue, suspense and sensory details.

Grammar and Usage of the English Language

By the end of the school year, students should demonstrate correct use of:

  • Grammar, including correct subject/verb agreement.
  • Paragraph structure, including main and supporting ideas.
  • Punctuation, including semi-colons, quotation marks, commas and colons.
  • Sentence construction, including correct subject/verb agreement and verb tense.
  • Spelling strategies for sixth-grade content-area vocabulary.

Grammar and Usage of the English Language

By the end of the school year, students should be able to revise work by:

  • Making their writing easier to understand
  • Rearranging the sequence of words, sentences and paragraphs.
  • Adding or deleting details and explanations
  • Using dictionaries, reference books and sample papers to assist in editing.
  • Learning word processing skills (e.g., deleting or copying text).

Spelling

  • Conventional spelling
  • Strategies to spell difficult words

Mathematics

Ratios and Proportional Relationships

  • Understand ratio concepts and use ratio reasoning to solve problems.

The Number System

  • Apply and extend previous understanding of multiplication and division to divide fractions by fractions.
  • Compute fluently with multi-digit

Numbers and find common factors and multiples.

  • Apply and extend previous understanding
  • Compute fluently with multidigit numbers and find common factors and multiples.
  • Apply and extend previous understandings of numbers to the system of rational numbers.

Expressions and Equations

  • Apply and extend previous understandings of arithmetic to algebraic expressions.
  • Reason about and solve one‐variable equations and inequalities.
  • Represent and analyze quantitative relationships between dependent and independent variables.

Geometry

  • Solve real‐world and mathematical problems involving area, surface area, and volume.

Statistics and Probability

  • Develop understanding of statistical variability.
  • Summarize and describe distributions.

Reading

Reading and Literature

  • Read extensively and comprehend a variety of genre both fiction and non-fiction including informational texts (such as reference materials, newspapers and magazines, and textbooks)
  • Select books on an appropriate level based on personal needs and interest
  • Show evidence of understanding reading in both writing and classroom discussion
  • Skim texts to get an overview of content or locate specific information
  • Put together ideas, information and points of view from several books
  • Identify and compare similar themes in a variety of books
  • Notice and think about the way descriptive language (similes, metaphors, personifications, for example) helps an author create meaning

Reading and Literature

  • Identify and compare literary elements (for example, setting, plot, character, rhythm, rhyme) in different types of literature
  • Examine the ways in which characters change an develop throughout a story
  • Develop and compare ideas (for example, draw conclusions, make predictions) about events, characters and settings from one book to another
  • Read silently and independently
  • Keep a record of what has been read, reflecting goals and accomplishments

Listening and Speaking

  • Students will participate in whole-class lessons, small-group meetings and one-to-one conversations with a teacher, in order to:
  • Make connections between different sources of information and ideas.
  • Ask questions to understand better.
  • Respond thoughtfully to questions, using details and examples.
  • Use knowledge from other subjects and personal experience to form and express opinions.
  • Take turns speaking and responding to each other’s questions and comments.
  • Share data, facts and ideas, and back them up with sources and explanations to persuade a listener.

Students will prepare and deliver an individual presentation, in which they:

  • Present reports for teachers and other students, in all subject areas.
  • Organize what they will say using notes or other memory aids.
  • Begin by stating a main idea or purpose, support it with details, examples and reasons, and end by summarizing main points.

Science

  • The Nature of Science and Technology
  • Energy
  • Earth in Space
  • Ecosystems and Humans’ Impact on the Environment

Science Skills

  • Inquiry Process
  • Prior Knowledge
  • Investigation
  • Communicate Data
  • Use Measurement Tools
  • Experiments
  • Classifying/Sorting
  • Map Skills
  • Graph Skills
  • Math Skills
  • Cooperative Work
  • Analyzing
  • Scientific Vocabulary
  • Making Predictions
  • Scientific Method
  • Charts & Tables

Social Studies

Eastern Hemisphere

  • Geography
  • Ancient River Civilizations
  • Medieval Europe
  • Ancient Greece and Rome
  • Civilization development and expansion

Skills

  • Maps and Globes
  • Charts and Graphs
  • Critical Thinking
  • Reading and Writing
  • Study and Research
  • Collaboration
  • Speaking

Exploratory Electives

10-week rotations of:

  • Art
  • General Music
  • Guidance
  • Environmental

7th Grade Curriculum

Foreign Language

Spanish or French

This course, for 7th graders, is the first part of the Level I course. It is the start of a language sequence which could continue through the senior year of high school. A multi-faceted approach to learning is utilized. Teachers incorporate audio-lingual as well as the audio-visual methods. Students begin to develop the four skill areas:

1. Listening

2. Speaking

3. Reading

4. Writing

In addition, students will learn about the customs and traditions of the people who live where the target-language is spoken.

Language Arts

Course Goals/Outcomes:

1. Students will be prepared to meet the New York State common core standards for language arts.

2. Students will be prepared to complete the E.L.A. assessment test to be administered in 7th grade.

3. Students will be prepared to read critically and discuss a wide range of literature.

4. Students will be prepared to write and read in a variety of genres.

5. Students will learn vocabulary by studying Latin roots and using context clues.

6. Students will learn to apply grammar rules in their writing.

7. Students will develop the social skills to work cooperatively with their peers.

Throughout the year, students will have opportunities to read both independent reading books and whole class novels. Please note that students are required to read 25 minutes for at least four nights a week unless otherwise noted.

Model UN & Debate

Jeff Sniffen

The goal of the class is to use the current issues of our global community to teach critical thinking, research, debate techniques, and effective writing skills. It is the hope of the Global Classrooms initiative to inspire future global leaders who can work collaboratively and creatively to bring about solutions to real problems facing our world today.

The course will run every other day throughout two quarters (one semester). It is the hope of this instructor that this class can act as an enrichment opportunity for students who are looking for a challenging course with a rigorous workload. The course will demand the very best effort from the students who can present a multitude of problem solving strategies in a collaborative setting.

Mathematics

This is a course in general math which reinforces and extends the work of the 6th grade program and expands on the following topics:

1. Algebraic Reasoning

2. Integers and Rational Numbers

3. Applying Rational Numbers

4. Patterns and Functions

5. Proportional Relationships

6. Percent

7. Collecting, Displaying and Analyzing Data

8. Geometric Figures

9. Measurement: 2-D Figures

10. Measurement: 3-D Figures

11. Probability

12. Multi-Step Equations and Inequalities

Science

Life Science is the study of the features and functions of living things. Life Science teaches concepts to students in such a way that they learn through their own experiences. Topics are covered by both discussion and laboratory work with emphasis on laboratory investigations. Current, meaningful information is emphasized. This course also develops an awareness of living things, the processes which keep organisms alive, and the ecological relationships that affect our environment. The various topics in Life Science offer a relevant introduction to life, the human body, and ecology. Students use their experiences in observation, in data gathering, and in studying cause and effect relationships to interpret the natural world.

Social Studies

This course content includes the development of the United States with a focus on New York State.

(Pre-Columbian America to the Civil War 1865.)

Major topics are:

1. The Global Heritage of the American People Prior to 1500

2. European Exploration

3. Colonial America

4. American Revolution

5. A Nation is Created

6. Experiments in Government

7. Life in the New Nation and State

8. Prelude to Civil War

Special Education Program

The Special Education Program includes special class and resource room instruction. The goal of both programs is to provide an individualized educational program based on the needs of each student. There is continual involvement of parents, teachers, guidance counselor, and the school social worker to insure that each student is receiving an appropriate educational program.

CO-TAUGHT CLASSES

Co-Taught classes may provide instruction in English, Social Studies, Science and Mathematics. While content parallels that of mainstream classes, instruction is provided according to students’ achievement levels. The goal of the program is to improve students’ educational skills.

RESOURCE ROOM

Most students enrolled in this program are scheduled for mainstreamed classes. The instructional emphasis is to support the students’ learning in various areas. Skill instruction for organization, note taking, written expression and reading comprehension. The resource room teacher consults regularly with classroom teacher and the guidance counselor to monitor student progress and to build on student strengths.

ECO

Mark Wick

Specials

Physical Education meets every other day. Students must change for class.

Band is a year long course that meets every other day.

Chorus is a year long course that meets every other day.

Discover, Create, and Innovate is a quarter long class that meets every day.

Art is a quarter long class that meets every day.

Home and Careers is a quarter long class that meets every day.

Health is a quarter long class that meets every day.

Guidance is a semester long class that meets every other day.

8th Grade Curriculum

Foreign Language

Spanish or French

This course, for 8th graders, is the second part of the Level I course. It is the start of a language sequence which could continue through the senior year of high school. A multi-faceted approach to learning is utilized. Teachers incorporate audio-lingual as well as the audio-visual methods. Students begin to develop the four skill areas:

1. Listening

2. Speaking

3. Reading

4. Writing

In addition, students will learn about the customs and traditions of the people who live where the target-language is spoken. High School credit will be awarded at the completion of the course.

Language Arts

Students will be developing their writing, reading, listening and speaking skills, and preparation for the E.L.A. (English Language Arts) examination administered by the State. Course Goals/Outcomes:

  • Students will be prepared to meet the Common Core learning standards for language arts.
  • Students will be prepared to complete successfully the E.L.A. assessment test to be administered in the 8th grade.
  • Students will be prepared to read critically and discuss a wide range of literature.
  • Students will master vocabulary found in the context of their reading.
  • Students will develop the social skills to work cooperatively with their peers and tolerate differences in others.

Readings may include:

  • Prentice Hall Literature: Silver Edition
  • Warriors Don’t Cry
  • The Cage
  • “A Midsummer Night’s Dream”
  • Animal Farm
  • House on Mango Street

Mathematics

Math 8

This course presents an organized development of common core mathematical skills and concepts. Students will continue to enhance their problem solving skills and will apply these skills in areas of algebra and geometry:

Topics include:

  • Rational Numbers
  • Graphing Linear Functions
  • Exponents
  • Ratios, Proportions, and Similarity
  • Geometric Relationships
  • Multi-step Equations
  • Systems of Equations

Algebra 1

The accelerated math curriculum is designed to meet the standards listed in the New York State Core Curriculum for Algebra I. These include skills in mathematical reasoning, numbers and numeration, operations, modeling/multiple representation, measurement, descriptive statistics, and patterns and functions. This course terminates with a Regents examination.

Science

Science 8

This course introduces the student to the fundamental concepts of physical science. Emphasis is placed upon the scientific method and the results of its application. Basic concepts of chemistry, physics, and earth science are covered with practical applications of these concepts in the laboratory.

Accelerated—HS Biology

Topics include:

  • Bio-chemistry of the cell
  • Structure
  • Function
  • Reproduction
  • Development
  • Genetics
  • Evolution
  • Ecology of both plants and animals

The course is a combination of lectures and laboratory work. A form of dissection will be completed. The final exam is the Living Environment Biology Regents.

Social Studies

In this course students will student, political, geographical economic and social issues. In addition we will study America’s interaction with the global community.

Topics for class focus on the following areas:

  • Reconstruction
  • Wild Westward Expansion
  • Industrial Society
  • Progressive Era
  • America becomes a World Power
  • World War I
  • Boom and Bust!
  • World War II
  • Cold War and the Modern American Dream
  • Civil Rights Movement
  • Tensions at Home and Abroad Contemporary
  • America

Specials

Physical Education meets every other day. Students must change for class.

Band is a year long course that meets every other day.

Chorus is a year long course that meets every other day.

Discover, Create & Innovate is a quarter long course that meets every day.

Art is a quarter long class that meets every day.

Home and Careers is a quarter long class that meets every day.

Health is a quarter long class that meets every day.

Special Education Program

The Special Education Program includes co-taught classes, special class and resource room instruction. The goal of both programs is to provide an individualized educational program based on the needs of each student. There is continual involvement of parents, teachers, guidance counselor, and the school social worker to insure that each student is receiving an appropriate educational program.

Special Class

Special classes provide instruction in English and Mathematics. While content parallels that of mainstream classes, instruction is provided according to students’ achievement levels. The goal of the program is to improve students’ educational skills.

Resource Room

The instructional emphasis is to support the students’ learning in various areas. Skill instruction for organization, note taking, written expression and reading are emphasized. The resource room teachers consult regularly with classroom teacher and guidance counselor to monitor student progress and to build on student strengths.